Why My credit repair Is Better Than Yours | Asbury Park NJ

10%: recent searches for credit: hard credit inquiries, which occur when consumers apply for a credit card or loan (revolving or otherwise), can hurt scores, especially if done in great numbers. Individuals who are “rate shopping” for a mortgage, auto loan, or student loan over a short period (two weeks or 45 days, depending on the generation of FICO score used) will likely not experience a meaningful decrease in their scores as a result of these types of inquiries, as the FICO scoring model considers all of those types of hard inquiries that occur within 14 or 45 days of each other as only one. Further, mortgage, auto, and student loan inquiries do not count at all in a FICO score if they are less than 30 days old. While all credit inquiries are recorded and displayed on personal credit reports for two years, they have no effect after the first year because FICO’s scoring system ignores them after 12 months.[citation needed] Credit inquiries that were made by the consumer (such as pulling a credit report for personal use), by an employer (for employee verification), or by companies initiating pre-screened offers of credit or insurance do not have any impact on a credit score: these are called “soft inquiries” or “soft pulls”, and do not appear on a credit report used by lenders, only on personal reports. Soft inquires are not considered by credit scoring systems.[8]
Thanks for the link! that explains that. I should of just went for the full HELOC that I qualified for, and only borrowed what I needed. BTW The loan went into a garage and new roofing which gave me additional equity as well!
The amount of credit you’re using compared to the total amount you have available is your credit utilization ratio, and is an important credit scoring factor. You can calculate your credit utilization rate by adding up your balances on your revolving credit accounts (such as credit cards) and dividing by your credit limit. Most experts recommend keeping your credit utilization ratio below 30% – so, for example, if you have a total credit limit of $10,000, you’d want to keep your balance below $3,000.
But things could also be a lot better. Scores lower than 630 are considered poor, so you might be denied for credit cards and loans or pay high interest rates for the ones you do receive. A low credit score signals to lenders that you’re more likely to default on your debts.
Remember that even though your credit reports are free every twelve months, your credit score is not included. It’s a separate calculation that is requested when your credit is pulled by third parties such as lenders and creditors. There are several monitoring services if you’d like to check out your score on a regular basis, or you can pay a one-time fee to FICO to access your score.
The differences in the scores you are seeing are due to the fact that these scores are based on information from different credit reporting agencies, In addition, different scoring models are being used. It’s not a matter of one being more accurate than the other, though if any of your credit reports contain mistakes you will want to dispute them.
These percentages are based on the importance of the five categories for the general population. For particular groups — for example, people who have not been using credit long — the relative importance of these categories may be different[4].
I don’t think it’s unreasonable for the landlord to request this. He or she doesn’t know there is nothing to report. You can ask the landlord if he will accept your son’t report from AnnualCreditReport.com (and if there is no report he should get a notice to that effect which you could potentially share with him.) But the reports landlords order sometimes include criminal background checks as well, and that wouldn’t show up there.
Until Credit Bureaus are truly regulated and focus on cleaning up their error riddled database consisting of anyone using unverified methods of submitting often false or mis-represented credit information to all three credit bureaus. These bureaus have a financial incentive to focus on selling those, who simply want their credit corrected, overpriced worthless monitoring products while making the effort of correcting false reported info difficult and based solely upon “their members” verification. The FCRA needs amended to overhaul the entire credit reporting system and place oversight under ONE entity with power to significantly fine up to $5 mil in egregious errors that are robbing consumers of billions of dollars and lining the pockets of both the creditors and the bureaus. Republicans are blind to the real underlying issues and the current regulations simply need to be enforced.
Credit scoring is a way to keep people in debt, in my opinion. To me the entire scoring system is a bunch of malarkey. I pay all my bills on time but can’t get my score above 620, even though I’ve paid off one car and am paying on another. The same explanation keeps occuring, that my ratio to balances are too high even though I’ve paid off one credit card and paid the other two down to less than $100. The entire system is rigged against most low to middle income people. Just my opinion.
I currently have 4 major cards I use and have been for over 7 to 10 years, They include 2 Amex Gold and Blue,Discover and Capitsl1, in addition I had a 48 month car loan paid off in 17 months and pat the balance on all credit cards in full each month. Before zi bought my car I had a FICO score of 795 from a major bank and 802 from another. During the time I had my car loan my monthly score varied from 776 to 801 this month. While having the loan I never missed any payments or was late on any payments, yet it seemed the monthly scores I received was more subjective rather then objective based on my status over the last 7/10 years. My payment history and credit score should have no impact on my care insurance or my ability to get a new loan.
And we, the taxpayers, bailed them out. That’s the icing on the cake. And Congress, the REAL bastards who were supposed to be on our side, didn’t force these banks to renegotiate the loans so Americans could keep their houses. These politicians smile in your face, shake your hand, and claim to feel your pain—in reality: they have NO IDEA what it’s like to struggle to pay their bills because we, the people, pay their bills every month.
If you continue to pay your bills on time, keep your balances low, and apply for credit judiciously, you will be able to maintain excellent credit scores and get the credit you deserve when you need it, at the best rates available – even though your score isn’t perfect
As shown in WalletHub’s 800 Credit Score analysis, 14.5% of people have a credit score of 800 or higher. This credit score qualifies as perfect, since improving your score further is unlikely to save you money on loans, lines of credit, or car insurance – you can qualify for pretty much any credit card or loan you want. A credit score of 800 or higher means that you’ve been using loans, credit cards and other lines of credit responsibly for several years, paying your monthly bills on time and keeping your credit report clear of negative information. Hope this helps!

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This chart is surprising to me. I am 26 and I have a Transunion score of 725, an Equifax score of 738, and my FICO is 720. I only have 4 credit cards and none of them have been open accounts for more than a year. My scores went up 30 and 31 points recently which is drastic at one time, but I keep my utilization below 10% most of the time. The highest amount I have utilized was 22% when I had to fix my car. As soon as the due amounts are posted online, I pay them. Even before the billing cycle. I also don’t use my credit cards for unneccessary purchases or when I don’t have money in my checking account to cover it. It really is simple to establish good credit, you just have to know what you’re doing and don’t let the urge to splurge come over you. I will say though, I have no loans, debt, no car lease, etc so that helps a great deal. Pay attention to the factors that have the highest impact on your scores.
I agree youcan live off if 22k and live good if you always kept your expenses in check and didn’t live above your means. If you don’t have a mortgage payment that’s a big chunk right that you’re not having to spend each month.
Because simply paying your bills isn’t enough to show that you are ‘worth the risk’. You have to have loans… a car payment, a mortgage, a few loans from your bank. At the same time, you have to keep a decent debt to credit ratio, ensuring you still make enough compared to your debt to be able to afford more debt.
Pay the debt then ask the creditor to report it as paid to the credit bureaus if they do not put in a dispute with credit Karma they will dispute it for you.  The creditor has 30 days to respond and fix it.
I was wondering Ive been working on credit repair and have had some things removed from my credit to only show back up a month or two later on credit report and how does medical debt collection affect my score I am 100% service connected disabled had to go to er a while back and the va has yet to pay the medical have requested statments from the collection agencys but say they dont have ist that a verifcation of debt not a letter from them saying I owe them
Fair Isaac Corp. produces the credit scoring algorithm used for the majority of lending decisions in the United States. Most FICO scores range from 300 to 850, and the higher the score, the better. (Some versions of the FICO score, such as those for the auto and credit card industries, are on different scales.)
In the United States, a credit score is a number based on a statistical analysis of a person’s credit files, that in theory represents the creditworthiness of that person, which is the likelihood that people will pay their bills. A credit score is primarily based on credit report information, typically from one of the three major credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Income and employment history (or lack thereof) are not considered by the major credit bureaus when calculating credit scores.
For some outside perspectives on just how realistic reaching the top of the credit-score scale is and how fruitful of an accomplishment that would be, we posed the following questions to a panel of personal finance experts. Meet them and see what they had to say, below.
I have always……………had good credit. When you read the report is is in,very good. HOWEVER, 9 years ago, a greedy Atty, who sent a bill 5x higher than he said the cost would be, (and by the way never did the work!), waited 3 years until after he knew I moved out of state TO FILE A SUIT IN SMALL CLAIMS COURT.
I have a score between 690 and 720 depending on the reporting agency. Seems to be no problem getting a CC but was turned down by 5 out of 6 banks for a car loan. Their reason was a prior bankruptcy and not enough credit. Seems that the credit score ultimately has little importance. I am retired with pretty good income and paid for home and cash in the bank. What’s the point of a good credit score if I get turned down anyway?
You know why auto payments will make your score go down? It’s the minimum payment. They want to see you pay in full or make large payments. They have everything covered I’ve been trying to figure this whole thing out & they want a mix of credit, cc’s, & some other type of loan. Not to mention, you really shouldn’t move too much. Even if you own your home. Anything over 5 years will get you a higher score. My hubby (FLBiker) & I built our last home 3 yrs ago & wanted to do a little more to it. Wanted to charge about 10k and not touch our savings. So I actually had to get some new cc’s so our utilization was over 20%! But I knew that our score would plummet if it went past 20%. Now he rotates the cards to buy lunch so they all get used a bit. Seems like we’re jumping through hoops?lol
Credit scores are used by lenders, including banks providing mortgage loans, credit card companies, and even car dealerships financing auto purchases, to make decisions about whether or not to offer your credit (such as a credit card or loan) and what the terms of the offer (such as the interest rate or down payment) will be. There are many different types of credit scores. FICO® Scores and scores by VantageScore are two of the most common types of credit scores, but industry-specific scores also exist.
Training in credit management can offer students the chance to become involved with the credit industry from entry-level to management positions. Explore some of the possible career paths by visiting the following links.
The system of credit reports and scores in Canada is very similar to that in the United States and India, with two of the same reporting agencies active in the country: Equifax and TransUnion. (Experian, which entered the Canadian market with the purchase of Northern Credit Bureaus in 2008, announced the closing of its Canadian operations as of April 18, 2009).

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