Who Really Uses credit repair | Middletown NJ

All these factors also play a role in the average credit of those between the ages of eighteen and twenty-one who are just beginning to build their credit. This age group is finding it harder and harder to gain any kind of credit initially at all.
Hard Inquiries: Hard inquiries appear on your credit report when you apply for new credit and can negatively impact your credit score. (Checking your own credit is a soft inquiry and does not impact your credit score.)
Good morning. Your admission of your issues is the 1st biggest step on the road to a better place financially speaking. The closest thing I’ve ever seen to something like what you mention is Dave Ramsey. He is a nationally syndicated talk show host and a best sellers list famous author that talks about what you asked. He and his books and courses are the best financial education I’ve ever received. I’ve read 3 of his books and have listened to his talk show a lot. You can start off by going to your local library and borrowing some of his books for free. After that, I went to Amazon to buy some other gently used books and courses of his, which were worth every penny. It’s hard to put it in a paragraph, but he deals with the A-Z’s of financial literacy and if you’ve read up on him, you’ll be in an AWESOME position not to repeat any of these types of mistakes ever again. Just my humble opinion, but I’m teaching my own kids what Dave taught me, so they aren’t doomed to repeat the same mistakes I’ve made when I fell flat on my face since my parents didn’t teach me fiscal and financial smarts. Take care and God Bless!
Um, not exactly true. I am over 50, have not had a car loan in a decade and all of my homes have been paid in full for almost 10 years. I literally have zero debt except for using credit cards. I use credit cards, paid off each month, instead of carrying much cash and my FICO score, as of today, is 840.
Every time you set a major financial goal, like becoming a homeowner or getting a new car, your credit is likely to be a part of that financing picture. Your credit scores will help lenders determine whether or not you qualify for a loan and how good the terms of the loan will be.
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I’m seeing a lot of young people with this type of credit. A high score doesn’t always equate to good credit, or even if you have a high score, lenders will not always pick up for a loan. Young people tend to have hyper inflated scores because in reality, they have no credit. 1 year of paying off your card is not good enough. Lenders don’t really start taking you serious until you have had quite a few years under your belt. It took me about 3 years to get a good visa card from my credit union with a limit of $7500, and only then they did it after I had several installment loans that I paid off, and an auto loan. In the same way, not using your credit but having several open accounts is also bad. Lenders will the potential debt you could get into, and if you have 10 cards with $1000 limits each,  you have the potential debt of $10,000 and they actually take that into consideration when they look at your debt to income ratio. The best way is to open maybe 2 cards (major cards not store as they have high interest rates) and use them only occassionally being sure to pay them off in 1 month.
Finally, it’s important to note that while many different types of credit scores exist, the most popular ones all use the standard 300 to 850 credit-score range. They’re also based on the same information – your credit reports – and produce very similar results in most cases, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. So it doesn’t really matter whether an average credit score is based on a VantageScore or FICO model, as long the data is consistent. After all, there isn’t one “real” credit score.
Here is my problem. Our credit history only dates back 1 year 10 months…We got 2 bad credit, credit cards when we started out. They have low lines of credit at $600 and $700. They charge us $75 a year for them. We now have good credit and way better cards and would like to drop the first two. They are only about 3 months older than our better cards. They hold us hostage with those fees because we are afraid to close them and drop our credit. We had a Kohls card for 3 months and decided to close it because we just didn’t use it and it dropped our credit by 15 points! How much will it drop if we close these 2 cards then?
I am just as frustrated and angry as most of you. My score is 676 and my hubby is 664. We have paid every bill every month for the last 5 years with no delinquency (in the last 5 years and NEVER a mortgage delinquency) and just got a new car loan after our cars (paid off for more than 8 years) finally died. I have seen my score go up slightly with the new loan and payments. Our utilization is below 15%. We are trying to get above 720 to get a good home loan but I feel like we are in a Catch 22 and we cannot figure out how to get our scores any higher. If they go up it is by only a pont or two a month. What can we do to increase faster?!
my credit sucks….and part of it is my fault….part not….i have always been in low paying jobs…struggling…..had a nice house….then my now ex decided not to pay the mortgage and not tell me…..then i remarried to a man making 60,000 up a year driving a truck…..had another house, car payment, i stayed home with the kids (day care was more than i earned)…..oops….husband developed parkinson’s disease…..can no longer drive…..so of course, i went back to work…..but what i could earn…..would not pay the bills…..lost the house, returned the car to the bank…..found a cheaper house that my salary could pay….end of story…now owe less than 10,000 on the house we are buying from a private person…..never been late on a house payment in 7 years…..have not had any utilites turned off….do not use credit at all……so my credit score is under 600….because the house is not reported.
There is a 91-point difference between the average scores of those in the oldest bracket of consumers and those in the youngest group, according to a new analysis that FICO performed for MONEY. With each decade, the average score increases by about 20 points.
This is the quickest way to deal with this problem. Contact the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) online or by phone. File a complaint by following the directions (doesn’t take very long at all…). The CFPB will contact the company for you and they have to respond to the CFPB within 2 weeks and take action. If the company/credit bureau’s have violated your rights, the CFPB will forward your complaint to the proper authorities and they may be in violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).
If you’re paying them off before they report, it is harming you more than helping.  Be cautious of paying back too often or too quickly.  And don’t forget that your debt to income ratio is a high factor when being considered for loans, mortgages, financing, etc.  If it doesn’t look like you’re pulling more money into an account than you’re spending on your bills each month your dti ratio might keep you from utilizing that good credit score,
Many factors are involved when it comes to determining what a good credit score is or not. Late payments, hard inquiries, and low balance and collections can all be detrimental to the overall health of your credit score. Therefore, it is important to understand the significant weight these components carry.
* They eat out frequently at nice restaurants and take pride in their collection of vintage red wine, but their frequent vacation spots are Columbus, Chicago, Pittsburgh and Niagara Falls (Pittsburgh’s “very eclectic Mattress Factory Art Museum is must-do,” he said.)
Below, you can find your city’s average credit score and see how it compares nationally. And in case you’re wondering, the 50 state capitals have a slightly higher average credit score (666) than that of the nation’s capital (664).
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Very similar beginnings you and I. The medical bills ALWAYS GET PAID LAST. Bro, if your at 639 I am sure you have learned enough to stop paying that $100 a month. Here is a trick to boost the score without adding debt and costing WAY less. Join a credit union. Do you own a car? it doesn’t matter… Join the CU and take out 12 month loans of $1500. Once you get the loan put it in the checking account and FORGET IT IS EVEN THERE. Set the payment so it is auto drafted from your account and just make sure you remember to deposit the interest. repeat the following year. If you can get a no fee credit card or maybe a $25 a year CC that you WILL BE ABLE TO PAY IN FULL EVERY MONTH. Use the CC like you would your check book. Balance and DO NOT buy what you do NOT need. Pay in full every month. WAIT! Want a free lunch? lol On that card it is a MUST to leave a small balance. The bank has to get something from you… Take the wife and kid to a fancy restaurant like WENDY’S…lol…. Try to carry a 60-70 dollar balance. Good Luck! my oldest just turned 18. I always worried about raising them, not letting them go.. Peace OUT!
A secured loan (which is what you are referring to), paid on time, should help. You might also consider getting a secured credit card, using it lightly (keeping the balance under 30% of the credit limit) and paying it on time. Here’s more about secured cards: How Secured Cards Help Build Credit
Jump up ^ “Equifax Completes Acquisition of Australia’s Leading Credit Information Company, Veda Group Limited, for Total Consideration of USD$1.9 Billion”. Equifax Australia. 2016-02-25. Retrieved 2018-03-06.
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If your FICO score is not as high as you would like it to be, there are things you can do to improve it. First of all, be sure to keep all of your bills current and in good standing. Always pay your bills when they come due, never make any payments late, and pay more than the minimum balance on your credit cards or pay them off completely if you can. The longer you have a good payment history, the higher your credit score will be.
All negative information will eventually be removed from your credit report and will stop impacting your credit score. In the interim, you can do your best to build a more positive credit history by bringing your accounts current, paying bills on time, and reducing your credit card balances. Over time, your credit score will improve and you’ll qualify for better interest rates and terms.
Disclaimer: NerdWallet strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Pre-qualified offers are not binding. If you find discrepancies with your credit score or information from your credit report, please contact TransUnion® directly.
The FICO site also says that 19.9 percent of Americans have a score over 800 and 34.8 percent have a score between 700 and 799. All in all, 54.7 percent of Americans fall into the “Good” or “Excellent” categories, while 21.9 percent are under 600 in the “Bad” category.
You’re seriously overlooking the whole point of what banks are doing. Your statement proved exactly why you are considered high risk. You had a high paying job, and bought a home and car that reflected that HIGH PAYING JOB income. Then you lost your high paying job. AND HAD NO WAY TO KEEP THE SAME LIFESTYLE. Aka you didn’t prepare for what the future could potentially bring. That by definition is A RISK to a bank. I just got a six figure job. Does that mean I go buy an even more expensive house right now? HELL NO. Because guess how much trouble I’m in when I potentially lose that job? It would spiral downward exponentially faster. Guess when you can go get that even more expensive house? When you have enough backup money saved up for any amount of long term you could potentially be “out of work” while achieving another position of equal value.
Your life experience sounds exactly like mine, and I think you’re spot on with the need for financial literacy education. I learned through my parents’ habits which were…non-ideal. I had a really rough 5-6 years crawling out of the hole from my mistakes. I know better now, but I could have saved a lot of stress (and a lot of interest) had I learned lessons the “easy way” ahead of time.
For consumers who still need help getting that number up closer to the national average, a respected credit repair company can be a good resource in getting outdated and incorrect items removed from your credit report.
“Maybe it’s not a needle in a haystack, but it’s close,” Seaton said, adding, “What’s fascinating to me is he is living the life, the way he wants to. But he has sense. That gives you a score you can be proud of.”
When it comes to your credit score, the higher it is, the better – as your score increases, so will the perks and rewards, while the interest rates and fees decrease. However, a credit score above 750 is already considered excellent, and striving to achieve a perfect 850 will not provide much of a difference. Once an individual is in the excellent credit range, there’s little more he or she can do to get access to even greater interest rates and financing.
The FICO scoring model will treat each late payment the same and will carry the same weight. However, the VantageScore model will look at each late payment differently which means they may have an even more significant impact on your credit.

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Credit scores are not included with credit reports. Additionally, credit scores are not stored as part of your credit history. Your credit score is calculated only when your credit score is requested. Your credit score can change over time, based on your credit history—including late payments, amount of available debt, and more.
Jump up ^ Use and impact of credit in personal lines insurance premiums pursuant to Ark. code Ann. §23-67-415 (September 1, 2006) – A report to the legislative council and the Senate and House committees on insurance and commerce of the Arkansas General Assembly (as required by Act 1452 of 2003)
The highest credit score you can have is 850. That’s the maximum credit score used by all of the most popular credit-scoring models today. You can learn more about the highest score you can get here: https://wallethub.com/edu/best-credit-score/39023/.
Your race, color, religion, national origin, sex or marital status (U. S. law prohibits credit scoring formulas from considering these facts, any receipt of public assistance or the exercise of any consumer right under the Consumer Credit Protection Act.)
In fact, the Pavelkas have a mortgage (with four years left,) an equity line that he usually uses to buy cars and then pays off, four credit cards with amounts due this month (they pay the bills in full each month) and a total of eight credit cards with available credit exceeding $120,000.
I have never ever heard of a credit score dropping for accessing a bank balance. Reporting agencies wouldn’t even know about that; are you certain that is the reason? The data breach affected me as well, and I have always been one to check my balance every day, just to keep an eye out for fraud.
Secured Loan -You borrow from your own savings. I agree, after a bankruptcy that couldn’t be avoided, by working hard at paying debts on time- my credit score has spiked near 800 in just 3 yrs. Use them and pay them off.
I was wondering Ive been working on credit repair and have had some things removed from my credit to only show back up a month or two later on credit report and how does medical debt collection affect my score I am 100% service connected disabled had to go to er a while back and the va has yet to pay the medical have requested statments from the collection agencys but say they dont have ist that a verifcation of debt not a letter from them saying I owe them
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So cool to see you hanging TUFF!! Most of us, “GUYS” end up looking like the idiots…. Stay at home dad for 12 years now… I have no problem cooking up some bacon for the bread winner… 19 years this June. Hope ya find the right one bro!!!
i was “up there” with a 798 credit score ..not a single late payment from 18-33..after buying a home and having a car loan..i lost my job and was unable to find related work at a comparable compensation : story? bankruptcy a pay cut and a now 640 credit score …i used to have pride like you ..until fate dealt my a nice blow..so be careful how you gloat

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