What the World Would Be Like If credit repair Didn’t Exist | Atlantic Highlands New Jersey 07716 NJ

Now suppose you want to buy that same car, same loan term, but your credit score is right on track with the national average of 695. Because you have those extra 80 points, your interest rate is 4.547 percent, and over the next four years you pay $1,912 in interest.
It doesn’t matter what your credit score is these day . Mine is 715. I think it’s all biased ! I’ve been struggling for 14 years since my husband passed away & on a decent fixed income. I’ve never been late paying any of my utility, rent. or loan obligations needed to survive. I’ve purchased 2 cars, both were payed off a year in advance. I had to recently purchase a used car that turned out to be a lemon because I could not be approved for a new car because of my credit score. What ! They should change the point system. Not everyone wants to get in debt to get out of debt. I surely don’t. So much for freedom of speech & the home of the free. We are living under American communism ruled by capitalist. So how free are we? So much for what the American Flag stands for & what our forefathers came to America for to have a better life !
Um, not exactly true. I am over 50, have not had a car loan in a decade and all of my homes have been paid in full for almost 10 years. I literally have zero debt except for using credit cards. I use credit cards, paid off each month, instead of carrying much cash and my FICO score, as of today, is 840.
In general, a FICO credit score above 650 is considered good, although many people strive to be above 750. It is practically impossible to score a perfect 850 FICO score because there are a lot of different items from your credit report which go into calculating your FICO score. Keep in mind that different lenders (mortgage, credit card, automobile loan) will use different methods of credit scoring to assess your credit risk.
Do not apply for several cards at the same time – Each time you apply for a new line of credit, a hard inquiry will appear on your credit report. Typically, a hard inquiry drops your credit score by five to 10 points, so you want to avoid applying for several loans within a short period of time.
Im a junior in college with loans and 2 credit cards, currently my credit score is 759. I am planning on working over the summer and I intend on buying a car, do you think I should wait for a bit longer and try to increase my score, or do you think I will be able to get decent rates with what I currently have?
Basically, if the credit card is from the same company, with a duplicate card with another cc number, you would file your complaint against the credit card company and ask them to remove the ‘duplicate’ account # from your credit reports. The cc company should be able to do this very quickly and easily for you.
People want to blame others for not understanding how the stock market works, but the truth is not many people have enough knowledge to safe-guard their money on the stock markets. I have seen well-educated people make mistakes that is common even among those with little to no knowledge of stocks. If you can afford it, get life insurance and put money away that is invested in a regular savings account or your mattress (fire proof) or just put it in the bank safe in incraments of $100 bills.
Maybe. The only additional thing we would recommend to boost your score is a small installment loan (which would help on the “loan diversity” part of your credit score. But on-time payments and low debt are your biggest allies, and you are already maximizing those. As time goes by, you’ll improve on “credit age” as well. You can see the factors that affect your score if you check your free credit score on Credit.com.
What are the primary reasons they list for your score being what it is? What credit scoring model are they using? (You may have to dig a little to figure that out.) If you get your free credit score from Credit.com, you’ll also get the reasons your scores are what they are, and an action plan for your credit.
Ray, Fist let me say I agree with everything you’ve said so far on this blog… hard for many people to hear and maybe even harder for them to even comprehend, but very true, most people live far beyond their means. That being said please look at the process of the securitization of loans which offloaded this risk of loans from banks to an intermediary which are then grouped and sold to investors as MBS (mortgage backed securities) often backed by further layers of securitization. The boom in this practice of offloading risk from banks is the primary cause of the sub-prime mortgage crises.
Pay off your balances – Reducing the number of active debt accounts you have is a good way to improve your credit. To accomplish this, you should choose the lowest balances and pay those off first. Once your balance is paid off, keep the card account open, but do not continue to make purchases using the cards.
Bear in mind that the credit performance highlighted above is by no means universally representative. It’s certainly possible to achieve perfect credit with a different background. And it’s entirely possible that you won’t reach such heights even with this sort of exemplary record.
Honestly i think people who give themselves too much credit should stop and think before gloating or even giving advice. Most of us out there know how to manage money but not everyone has the same advantages as the person next to you. Imagine being poor bringing home $800.00 a month because you have no education and you can’t afford to not work while putting yourself through school. $800.00 doesn’t pay the average rent, utilities, a vehicle to get to work and all the other extra expenses the government chooses to throw on individuals. I understand some of the people on here claim it is helpful advice but poor people are not less intelligent than the rich. Most of us already know how to save but not every situation makes it possible. Should poor people not want to try to have what others do when most of the people with money laugh at them calling them names and ridiculing them? Let us be honest in the world we live in. I know a few people who wished they did not grow up in the families they did because there wasn’t any support at all. Then rich people say well thats why we have support programs, grants and student loan programs to aide them, well this is where the rich need some lessons because 1. Grants require certain guidelines to get approved which usually mostly fathers and mothers only get but a single individual usually gets turned down. 2. Student Loans also have requirements and if the person chose the wrong career path then they might as well not have gone in the first place since their debt to income ratio almost equals the poor. 3. Its awesome that some programs can assist people but for someone extremely dirt poor there are just not enough programs to help them. Let us also mention the fact that we tend to frown anytime someone supposedly “freeloads” which sets the mood to deter people from using the assistance. So this $800.00 income leaves this individual not only starving but eventually homeless. Good for you rich people on here that act as if it is the poor person’s fault to why they couldn’t save.
Although, credit scores can be improved in a few weeks, most improvements take months and some take years. It may take time, but paying on time, every time, and keeping credit balances low will slowly, steadily improve your credit.
Anonymous, you hit it right on the nail. My family and I are very loyal to our homeowner, who we’ve been renting a home from for almost 9 years (all payments made on time), and we now have to move. However, we’ve been having difficulty getting a loan due to our bad credit scores (though we all work very hard). Maybe one day we’ll own a house, though we can only hope.
Continue paying down the cards. You don’t have to have an open installment loan to have good credit. Yes it helps, but credit mix is only 10% of the score while debt usage (utilization) is a much bigger factor.
I’ve had a lot of credit issues I filed for bankruptcy at the age of 21 in 2007 I was irresponsible. I’m back to work and I went and bought a car this year my credit score was over 600 after buying the car my credit went down to 443 and my inquiries are up to 13. I really need some help I’ve paid my bills on time nothing is working it just stays the same. I haven’t applied for anything after my car but I only had 3 inquiries when I bought my car. In my credit report there are things that were paid off still showing negative, from 2005 10 years ago.
i have a CS 612-629, jus got approved for 2 CC frm CapOne w/ $500 CL each. I have nothing on my credit report but a student loan paid off. i plan on charging 30% or $150 each card and pay bal full ea month. Is this fine to build my CS quickly n efficiently? i can only pay monthly but read some of u pay weekly, is weekly a quicker way to CS or bout same as monthly. I don’t like credit prefer save n buy cash but i want a car (new) in a year and house in two. lol please help, advise lol
I have a 731 credit score and I just turned 21, never got any loans besides a student loan which I started paying automatically in November of last year, my credit history is just over a year old, had several late payments and maxed out one of my 2 credit cards yet my score had went up from 674 in January to 731 in April…and my credit lines doubled…all I did was make most of my purchases with my credit cards and pay the entire thing every couple weeks.
All negative information will eventually be removed from your credit report and will stop impacting your credit score. In the interim, you can do your best to build a more positive credit history by bringing your accounts current, paying bills on time, and reducing your credit card balances. Over time, your credit score will improve and you’ll qualify for better interest rates and terms.
The accumulation of wealth and experience over time is the most likely explanation for this. As people age, they also tend to grow more financially responsible and secure, qualities that lend themselves to credit improvement. And the more time you have, the more opportunity there is to recover from mistakes. Another reason is the way credit scores are calculated. The length of your credit history accounts for a significant portion of your score (around 15%), for one thing.

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Several factors affect individual’s credit scores. One factor is the amount an individual borrowed as compared to the amount of credit available to the individual. As an individual borrows, or leverages, more money, the individual’s credit score decreases.
You can take out a secured loan. That means you secure the loan with a savings account in the same amount. So, you put $1,000 in a savings and borrow a $1,000. The savings account pays for the loan and if you set it up on auto draft then you will never be late. Just make sure you include the interest.
You’re seriously overlooking the whole point of what banks are doing. Your statement proved exactly why you are considered high risk. You had a high paying job, and bought a home and car that reflected that HIGH PAYING JOB income. Then you lost your high paying job. AND HAD NO WAY TO KEEP THE SAME LIFESTYLE. Aka you didn’t prepare for what the future could potentially bring. That by definition is A RISK to a bank. I just got a six figure job. Does that mean I go buy an even more expensive house right now? HELL NO. Because guess how much trouble I’m in when I potentially lose that job? It would spiral downward exponentially faster. Guess when you can go get that even more expensive house? When you have enough backup money saved up for any amount of long term you could potentially be “out of work” while achieving another position of equal value.
The three credit bureaus – Equifax, Experian and TransUnion – also have created the VantageScore, which ranges from 501 to 990, and the VantageScore 3.0, which ranges from 300 to 850 (to mimic the FICO range). The VantageScore is growing in popularity among lenders but still isn’t as widely used as the FICO score. No matter the name, scores can vary by credit bureau depending on when the score was calculated and what specific method was used to make the calculation. Each credit bureau has its own formula.
Charging a higher interest rate for those with a low credit score seems punitive. On the surface, it looks like those who have a low score would be less likely to afford the loan, and ultimately less likely to build their credit score. But we have to remember: low credit doesn’t mean bad with money.
VantageScore 3.0 and FICO 8, the most commonly used credit scoring models, have a range of 300 to 850. Each lender sets its own standards for what constitutes a “good” score. But, in general, scores fall along the following lines:
Ultimately, what’s considered a good or fair credit score will depend on how the lender views it, but you can get an idea of how lenders are likely to view your applications by checking your score and seeing how it compares to others.
There are different methods of calculating credit scores. FICO scores, the most widely used type of credit score, is a credit score developed by FICO, previously known as Fair Isaac Corporation. As of 2018, there are currently 29 different versions of FICO scores in use in the United States. Some of these versions are “industry specific” scores, that is, scores produced for particular market segments, including automotive lending and bankcard (credit card) lending. Industry-specific FICO scores produced for automotive lending are formulated differently than FICO scores produced for bankcard lending. Nearly every consumer will have different FICO scores depending upon which type of FICO score is ordered by a lender; for example, a consumer with several paid-in-full car loans but no reported credit card payment history will generally score better on a FICO automotive-enhanced score than on a FICO bankcard-enhanced score. FICO also produces several “general purpose” scores which are not tailored to any particular industry. Industry-specific FICO scores range from 250 to 900, whereas general purpose scores range from 300 to 850.
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By increasing your credit score, you will have access to better financial opportunities, such as lower interest rates and better credit card offers. To see what credit card offers are available to you, check out our CardMatch tool or review or list of fair credit cards and cards for those with no credit history.
No need to obsess about hitting that 850 mark. But if you want to try and reach it: Pay all your bills on time, eliminate nearly all of your debt (excluding a mortgage) and use, on average, no more than 7% of your available credit from all your accounts.
An easier quicker way to raise your score after bankruptcy is to make WEEKLY payoffs on your credit card. I raised my score 30+ points within 3 months by doing that after my bankruptcy. I don’t personally like to pay someone interest…and rarely have in my life….just on cars and homes. I too took out a loan but only paid minimum payments for 3 months…then paid the whole thing off with savings. I didn’t want to pay them tons of months of interest. Only wanted to pay 3 months to raise my score. If you want to get a secured loan, I wouldn’t go as high as $1000. Just do $200 or $250…that way you can raise your score with payments, but not lose much in interest money.
Cut all mine in half 20 years ago, paid them all off. Never went back. Married, 2 kids, 4 cars and a decent mortgage rate. Live on cash and savings and lay away plans. In 20 years I have learned one thing, credit cards are GARBAGE. Live within your means even if its poor and making balogna sandwiches for lunch and telling people at the office “Nope, packed my lunch.” and driving a beat up car. Trust me. Never went back, have more left on my paycheck to save and put away and best thing I ever did. I still can buy a car and house juuust fine. The offers come in the mail, I rip then in 1/2 and throw them in the trash without a second thought.
And we, the taxpayers, bailed them out. That’s the icing on the cake. And Congress, the REAL bastards who were supposed to be on our side, didn’t force these banks to renegotiate the loans so Americans could keep their houses. These politicians smile in your face, shake your hand, and claim to feel your pain—in reality: they have NO IDEA what it’s like to struggle to pay their bills because we, the people, pay their bills every month.

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