What Experts Are Saying About credit repair | Spring Lake New Jersey 07762 Monmouth NJ

My credit was excellent and then I decided to get a new car, motorcycle & some of those cc’s with good points, rewards. That dropped my score down to bac down fair at the moment! I have quite a few cc’s and all are paid in full each month. So I know my score will go back up. Actually, I”m trying to raise it as high to 850 as I can. It seems after following these forums, you can see what you need to do to have an excellent score. I had a mortgage a couple cc’s. Not enough to get that “excellent” score. I’m starting to see they want you to be able to “handle” your credit very wisely. A higher cl but a very low utilization seems to do the trick with a various mix of loans. Thanks everyone for your input. I would be stuck in the 600’s forever if I didn’t start reading this forum!
Bear in mind that the credit performance highlighted above is by no means universally representative. It’s certainly possible to achieve perfect credit with a different background. And it’s entirely possible that you won’t reach such heights even with this sort of exemplary record.
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Credit bureaus also often re-sell FICO scores directly to consumers, often a general-purpose FICO 8 score. Previously, the credit bureaus also sold their own credit scores which they developed themselves, and which did not require payment to FICO to utilize: Equifax’s RISK score and Experian’s PLUS score. However, as of 2018, these scores are no longer sold by the credit bureaus. Trans Union offers a Vantage 3.0 score for sale to consumers, which is a version of the VantageScore credit score. In addition, many large lenders, including the major credit card issuers, have developed their own proprietary scoring models.
And it’s not like you can know with absolute certainty what is affecting your credit score. FICO says 35% of your score derives from your payment history and 30% from the amount you owe. But in actually calculating the score, each of these categories is broken down even further, and FICO doesn’t disclose how that works. (See also: Do You Understand Your Credit Score?)
Don’t assume your score is good (or isn’t) just because you have always paid your bills on time (or haven’t.) The only way to know whether you have a good credit score is to check. You can get your credit score free at Credit.com. This is a truly free credit score – no payment information is requested. In addition to the number, you’ll see a breakdown of the factors that affect your score and get recommendations for making your credit as strong as possible.
Im just now starting to build my credit ive just checked it and it says 667.ive heard it was ok score but i would like to gear from a sure source.Also is it true some debt is wiped off your credit in 7yrs? Please help me understand.
Collection Actions: Collections are considered continuations of the original debt, so they will also be deleted seven years from the original delinquency date of the original account, which is when the account first became past due.
A good credit score can also get you a lower interest rate when you borrow. That means you will pay less over time. For example, if you’re buying a $300,000 house with a 30-year fixed mortgage, and you have good credit, then you could end up paying more than $90,000 less for that house over the life of the loan than if you had bad credit. So, in the end, it really pays to understand your credit scores and to make them as strong as possible.
Never Miss a Payment: If there’s one thing you can control when it comes to credit building, it’s payment history. Payment history accounts for at least 35% of most credit scores. And you can avoid forgetting to pay your bill by setting up automatic monthly payments from a bank account. You just need to make sure there’s enough cash available in the account every month to cover the payments.
You have a FICO Credit Score for each of the three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and Transunion. Each of these scores is based on different information that each of the bureaus has for you, and as mentioned above, this available information may very well differ from bureau to bureau.
I’m not sure what you are doing that results in your score. Perhaps it’s because you haven’t had credit with the same companies for long enough? My score is 819. I don’t have a car loan or a mortgage either, and have never paid late. I also don’t have a student loan. Perhaps it was credit related to your divorce? By the way, my credit score was 794 for a long time because I got a new credit card. Now that all my credit cards are at least 6 years old, and one is over 20 years old, they raised my score.
The system of credit reports and scores in Canada is very similar to that in the United States and India, with two of the same reporting agencies active in the country: Equifax and TransUnion. (Experian, which entered the Canadian market with the purchase of Northern Credit Bureaus in 2008, announced the closing of its Canadian operations as of April 18, 2009).
You are an arrogant one. Many people have been killed credit wise by medical bills and other unpredictable events. Yet you claim they chose that road and now have to live with it. Taking advantage of people because of life is a scummy game, yet you and lenders would have us believe it’s fair. Just because it is mathematical it is correct? Talk about a lemming. I don’t need to think for myself they already did it. The king has no clothes. Gouging people increases the lenders risk by setting up the lendee to fail. It is a business model that is a win win for the lender and a lot of risk for the lendee.
Im a junior in college with loans and 2 credit cards, currently my credit score is 759. I am planning on working over the summer and I intend on buying a car, do you think I should wait for a bit longer and try to increase my score, or do you think I will be able to get decent rates with what I currently have?
Balances on credit card debt, mortgages, and auto loans are all below average in this state, and in several other midwestern areas. Debt delinquencies are also low, giving many people a credit score boost across the state.
You might have heard that borrowing money and repaying it is a good way to build credit, and that’s true. But taking on debt you can’t afford won’t help. If you want to borrow money because you have bills you can’t cover, it’s possible credit counseling or bankruptcy would be better solutions.
There are several types of FICO credit score: classic or generic, bankcard, personal finance, mortgage, installment loan, auto loan, and NextGen score. The generic or classic FICO score is between 300 and 850, and 37% of people had between 750 and 850 in 2013, and 56.8% had between 700 and 850 in 2017.[10] According to FICO, the median classic FICO score in 2006 was 723 and 711 in 2011.[11] The FICO bankcard score and FICO auto score are between 250 and 900. The FICO mortgage score is between 300 and 850. Higher scores indicate lower credit risk.[12]
Another common question is whether checking your own credit report or score can hurt it. The answer is no. Checking your own credit scores doesn’t lower them. Checking your own credit report creates a special kind of inquiry (known commonly as a soft inquiry) that isn’t considered in credit score calculations. Without the risk of harming your scores by checking your credit report and scores frequently, don’t steer away from viewing them as often as you need to.
A credit score is a numerical expression based on a level analysis of a person’s credit files, to represent the creditworthiness of an individual. A credit score is primarily based on a credit report information typically sourced from credit bureaus.
Credit Management Control is committed to treating our clients’ customers with respect and understanding. We employ bilingual collectors, record calls to ensure compliance with regulations on the part of our collectors and train our collection staff to take a “here’s what I can do for you” approach to collections, offering consumers solutions that will help them fulfill their financial obligations to our clients.
My credit score is 782. My wife’s score is very close to that if not higher. We are about to purchase a new home. At the same time, I need to take out a $20,000 personal loan to make a large purchase for the new home. We anticipate no issues with securing the mortgage or the personal loan, but I’d hate for my credit rating to go down if I just acquired the personal loan beforehand. How much of a hit should my credit rating take and would it cause problems securing the mortgage even if we would be well-qualified otherwise?
* For years, he and his wife carpooled 16 miles to work (he to downtown Cleveland, her to Euclid,) in part so that he could avoid paying for downtown parking and avoid racking up miles on another car.
These percentages are based on the importance of the five categories for the general population. For particular groups — for example, people who have not been using credit long — the relative importance of these categories may be different[4].
© 2007–2018 Credit Karma, Inc. Credit Karma™ is a registered trademark of Credit Karma, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Product name, logo, brands, and other trademarks featured or referred to within Credit Karma are the property of their respective trademark holders. This site may be compensated through third party advertisers.
Pavelka found out about his stellar credit score after he went shopping recently at Bass Pro Shop outside of Toledo. Pavelka is an avid hunter, and the store had a sale on a piece of equipment. Plus, if you used a Bass Pro credit card, the store would pay your sales tax, which would amount to more than $50 for his big purchase.
If you want a credit card, consider an alternative: “Consumers with poor credit scores — less than 630 — are generally best off with a secured credit card,” says NerdWallet credit card expert Sean McQuay. These cards require you to make an upfront deposit that serves as collateral in case you don’t pay, and they generally have an annual fee. A retail card is another possibility; some discount stores, in particular, might have lower credit score requirements than banks do.
Jump up ^ Use and impact of credit in personal lines insurance premiums pursuant to Ark. code Ann. §23-67-415 (September 1, 2006) – A report to the legislative council and the Senate and House committees on insurance and commerce of the Arkansas General Assembly (as required by Act 1452 of 2003)
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I have a 669 credit score from Equifax, never can get thru to them & has been going down & was sent to me by my insurance co. USAA in Feb. but will not show up very well even though I make all payments. They do show some mistakes, bad ones that I never had anything to do with but is next to impossible to get thru to. Been going down for about 6 yrs. In the Natural gas industry & spot price of gas is at about a 20 yr. low plus had to sell some expensive , paid for luxury property because housing bust hit at the same time along with expenses going up & doubling of property taxes.. Grew up with excellent credit but sinking. Plus drilled 2 dry holes, just trying to keep my income at a good healthy level. At the same time of everything else.Not much hope. I’m 68 now & the ups * downs have been going on for many years.
Ray the banks set people up to fail by making unreasonable often times high interest rates that are purpotrated on the poor or middle class. If a poor person was given a low interest rate and reasonable payments like the rich often get then I guarantee you they wouldn’t be struggling or failing in paying back loans. In addition the whole system is rigged. There are numerous articles out you can find online that talk about how banks want people to fail on their loans. The reason being is they actually make money on bank loan defaults and foreclosures. That is why they won’t work with people on better monthly terms to salvage people who are struggling in payments due to unexpected economic downturns or losses. You can even read about this in the book called “Greedy Bastards” by Dylan Ratigan who talks about this. It is called “extractionism”. What they did that helped cause the crash of 08 was take their “risky loans” and bundle them up with Triple A rated loans and sell them off to unsuspecting people who were investing in the market. They bought insurance on the faulty loans because they knew they would be loans that would default so that not only did they get money selling them, they got money on the insurance default of those loans. They got paid billions on all those bad loans. They set it up that way on purpose and use the excuse that people who are poor are higher risk, which in fact is not always true. Many people in the US have bought into this crap about “well they are higher risk therefore we charge them more”. Just like people bought into the “trickle down” economics.
Only apply for credit if you’re relatively confident you’ll be approved. Every application — whether you’re approved or not — can cause a small, temporary drop in your credit score, and those can add up. You don’t want to lose the points without getting the credit.
Ron, I’m thinking the drop in score is because of the addition of the inquiry necessary to get any credit card, not because of the balance. If you pay the balance before the statement it will show $0 on your statement and they will not report the payment made on time because I did that the first month with my secured card and found that out. Your score will improve, just remember to keep your inquiries in check just like your debt percentage and payment history.

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There are many different credit scores available to lenders, and they each develop their own credit score range. Why is that important? Because if you get your credit score, you need to know the credit score range you are looking at so you understand where your number fits in. Here are the credit score ranges used by major credit scoring models:
1. Pay on time. Payment history is the top factor in most credit scoring models, says Gerri Detweiler, director of consumer education at Credit.com. So payments that are 30 days or more late can quickly drag down your credit score. And one late payment is enough to hurt your score, she says. According to myFICO.com, 96% of consumers with a credit score of 800 pay credit accounts on time; 68% of those with a score of 650 have accounts past due.
It is very difficult for a consumer to know in advance whether they have a high enough credit score to be accepted for credit with a given lender. This situation is due to the complexity and structure of credit scoring, which differs from one lender to another.
Of course, a specific score doesn’t guarantee that you’ll be approved for credit or get the lowest interest rates, but knowing where you stand may help you determine which offers to apply for – or which areas to work on before you apply.
Um, not exactly true. I am over 50, have not had a car loan in a decade and all of my homes have been paid in full for almost 10 years. I literally have zero debt except for using credit cards. I use credit cards, paid off each month, instead of carrying much cash and my FICO score, as of today, is 840.
Failure to repay your debt as you originally agreed to do can negatively impact your scores. From missed and late payments to charge-offs, collections, and settled accounts, you will find many things that can impact you if you are not careful.
Think of your credit scores like a report card that you might review at the end of a school term, but instead of letter grades, your activity ends up within a scoring range. However, unlike academic grades, credit scores aren’t stored as part of your credit history. Rather, your score is generated each time a lender requests it, according to the credit scoring model of their choice.
Rather than putting money into an account and then borrowing against it (which will entail interest payments), a person should apply for a secured credit card and pay off the balance in full each month. This will help build credit. Once a credit history is established, then decide if you want to apply for a few other credit cards in order to build a more substantial credit history.
Because it’s such an important factor in credit scoring, protecting your payment history is the single best thing you can do for your credit. If you have any past-due accounts, bring them current right away and continue to make payments on time, every time. Additionally, consider paying down high credit card balances to reduce your total debt and improve your credit utilization ratio, which positively affect your credit scores.
my house, paid for. car paid for, work truck paid for, I keep credit cards in the single digits utilization, currently less than 2%. My score is 753. whatever, I don’t need to buy a car or house or take out a loan to raise my score! geez, I still use 0% cards, usually with $100 or so bonus then more rewards. I only established any kind of score a couple years ago, reports said I had no history…takes time & for sure never miss a payment, maybe couple more years I might get up to 780?
A credit score measures how likely you are to repay money you’ve borrowed. This can only be demonstrated over time. How long does it take to hit the highest credit score? Since credit payment histories can go back seven years — and 10 in the case of bankruptcy — you may need a seven-year time period.3 Plus, any accounts in your name are included in your credit report for as long as they stay open and active, so these continuously contribute to your score.4
Because you are more likely to default on your loan, the lender must charge more to make it worth their time. As your score improves and you represent less risk, you are rewarded with a lower interest rate.
There is no requirement that says that you have to have a car, but if you do have one you need to be able to maintain it and if you can’t maintain it that means that you cannot afford one. Cars break down when they are not maintained so the money people think they are saving skipping maintenance always comes back to bite them in the end.
Although there are many different credit scores, your main FICO (Fair Isaac) score is the gold standard that financial institutions use in deciding whether to lend money or issue credit to consumers. Your FICO score isn’t actually a single score. You have one from each of the three credit reporting agencies – Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Each FICO score is based exclusively on the report from that credit bureau. The score that FICO reports to lenders could be from any one of its 50 different scoring models, but your main score is the middle score from the three credit bureaus. If you have scores of 720, 750 and 770, you have a FICO score of 750. (And you need to take a hard look at your credit reports because those three numbers are considered wildly different.)
My credit score with Equifax is 463, which Equifax stated (and I believed) to be good! Obviously not! I don’t own my own home, I have one store card that appears as a credit card on my credit file, and two store cards. I am not in debt, have no judgements against me and always pay double the due amounts before the due dates. So basically unless I am knee high in credit I cant get any credit! Can anyone tell me how I can up my score without compromising myself.
I’d say get a car loan for a/2 the value of your car and put the money in the credit union savings acct and have auto payments deducted from that acount to establish a loan payment other than credit cards. or you could take the car loan amount and pay off the credit card so your unsecured credit cards are not as maxed out and you have now a fixed rate loan on your credit report.

4 Replies to “What Experts Are Saying About credit repair | Spring Lake New Jersey 07762 Monmouth NJ”

  1. Use CreditCards.com’s CardMatch tool to get prequalified for an offer that suits you. This will also help you avoid applying for cards that may reject you – which will have a negative impact on your score.
    Pay the debt then ask the creditor to report it as paid to the credit bureaus if they do not put in a dispute with credit Karma they will dispute it for you.  The creditor has 30 days to respond and fix it.
    As the advocate for business credit and financial management professionals NACM and its network of Partners take great pride in being the primary learning, knowledge, networking and information resource for commercial creditors nationwide.
    Thanks for the link! that explains that. I should of just went for the full HELOC that I qualified for, and only borrowed what I needed. BTW The loan went into a garage and new roofing which gave me additional equity as well!
    Growing up, my family couldn’t really help me understand how to save money as they were never that great at it. Even in the military most low rank soldiers lived paycheck to paycheck if they had a family. Outside the military I didn’t know ANYONE that didn’t live close to paycheck to paycheck (including business owners) until I started working in IT (after school).
    There are a lot of people out there with incomes into the six figures that have bad credit. The reason is not that they don’t make enough money or that they aren’t saving enough. The reason is that they have made bad choices with their debt.
    Actually you have no clue why you are down ! I am retired have my house paid for 12 years now. Buy new cars every 10-12 years weather I need one or not. I have 4 credit cards all for different purpose that I pay off every month fully.. My score is 817 and my better half is 827. Hers is higher because she is a female! BTW I have not had any credit in 12 years other then my credit cards !!!
    Licensing information is provided in the BBB Business Profiles to inform the public about industries that may require professional licensing, bonding, or registration. Better Business Bureau encourages you to check with the appropriate agency to be certain any requirements are currently being met.
    If you’re at 600 and struggling not to drop further, your situation is different. Maybe you’ve had a series of late payments or have debts in collections. These are signs that your financial situation is unstable.

  2. The three main credit bureaus are Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. Each bureau gives you a score, and these three scores combine to create both your 798 FICO Credit Score and your VantageScore. Your score will differ slightly among each bureau for a variety of reasons, including their specific scoring models and how often they access your financial data. Keeping track of all five of these scores on a regular basis is the best way to ensure that your credit score is an accurate reflection of your financial situation.
    That’s a tough break man and I feel for you, but that kinda drives the point home. This isn’t a debate about fairness of job opportunities and longevity. In that situation you are a risk to a lender. Someone in a bad situation who you can’t be certain can pay back the loan. The score is a risk factor rating. The simplest example I can give is breaking it down to it’s most basic form. Someone wants to borrow money from you. A complete stranger. It’s not about how much you want to help someone in need. You have to decide based on how likely it is that person can pay you back when they’re supposed to. Are you more or less likely to believe they can pay you when they don’t have a job and already have outstanding debt and/or a plethora of other financial obligations?
    Because it’s such an important factor in credit scoring, protecting your payment history is the single best thing you can do for your credit. If you have any past-due accounts, bring them current right away and continue to make payments on time, every time. Additionally, consider paying down high credit card balances to reduce your total debt and improve your credit utilization ratio, which positively affect your credit scores.
    The comments posted below are not provided, reviewed or approved by the card issuers or advertisers. Additionally, the card issuer or advertiser does not assume responsibility to ensure that all posts and/or questions are answered.
    My daughter has been paying ccs on time for the past 16 months, after a period of being irresponsible. Only 1 company reduced her exorbitant interest rate though ALL stated they’d do that if she paid on time for 6 months. She’s been at her job for 6 years & just got a new car (she traded in her older car to the same company, so they ‘ignored’ her ‘average’ FICO). [Also, it’s a smaller car, so smaller monthly payment.] I’d love her to get a
    Because simply paying your bills isn’t enough to show that you are ‘worth the risk’. You have to have loans… a car payment, a mortgage, a few loans from your bank. At the same time, you have to keep a decent debt to credit ratio, ensuring you still make enough compared to your debt to be able to afford more debt.
    i don’t understand how i have a 671 score on experian, a 745 on transunion, and a 756 on equifax. experian says i have 12 late payments, that i don’t see on my other credit reports. i am not understanding this at all. if i buy something for 5.00, my score goes down, debt ratio goes up? what is going on? i have 100% payment with transunion and equifax, which is excellent with them, but experian gives me a f, for payment history! really? you cannot win. you will only win when you die! terrible!
    If you have a grandparent or someone who has a very old account, get them to put you as an authorized user and it will skyrocket your length of history and ontime payments.  Then contact the dental company with a goodwill letter just simply asking if you could please have it taken off.  The worst thing they can do is say no, but they usually have no problems if you’re polite.  If the dental bill is in collections or is charged off, don’t contact them.  Just wait for it to fall off unless it is brand new.  Then get yourself a couple secured cards and up your available credit, use them just for gas and things and pay them off each month.  Within a month you can have 100 pts added just from some simple measures.
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  3. It is always good to have a high credit score; however, it may take years to achieve a perfect score. We are talking about a lot of effort here. Of course, you can save money with an excellent FICO credit score. A good example would be a mortgage loan — with an excellent credit score, you can get low interest rates, thus you can save money on the interest that you pay back.
    There is not a direct correlation between credit quality and age, though. In 2016, the average person with bad credit was 11 years older than the average person with excellent credit, as the following table shows.
    FICO undoubtedly has a team of attorneys telling it to drive home the point that it (the company) doesn’t judge somebody’s credit risk. It only reports a score and can provide guidance based on statistical data. A person isn’t a high credit risk per se if they have a 500 FICO score. FICO just reports, based on its statistics, that people with a lower score have defaulted on loans more than those with a higher score. See the difference?
    The very best thing you can do is pay all your debts on time and whittle down the balances on your credit cards. (Experts recommend using no more than 30% of your overall limit, and less is even better.) If you do that and keep accounts open, you’ll start restoring your credit score — and eventually become eligible for credit products with friendlier terms.
    Opening a new account lowers your time with a card, thus affecting your score negatively. The longer you have a card the better. Example if you have 1 card for 8 years Your average is 8 years. Open another new card and now your average time with 2 cards is 4 years. The longer you have a card the better.
    Very old system, low pay no raises offered, hard to hit goals, & no advancement within the company. Managers blame you for why people are not paying their medical debt. Even after averaging 150-200 calls a day, VERY repetitive. And when raffling prizes it is ridge in the CEO favor of his favorites. Managers are very patient if you have a problem and/or a concern with a accounts. Also benefits are pricey, and bonuses aren’t nice when you finally hit goals. I’d strongly suggest working elsewhere !
    “The most important thing about a credit score is not the actual number, but the factors that contributed to the calculation of that score,” says Henson. “The score factors are the actionable pieces of information for consumers. For example, if a score factor is a high utilization, one solution is paying down debt.”
    Continue paying down the cards. You don’t have to have an open installment loan to have good credit. Yes it helps, but credit mix is only 10% of the score while debt usage (utilization) is a much bigger factor.
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  4. Actually you’re just off the mark in some areas. I have a 8 year history with no loans just 3 credit cards the newest of which is about 4 years old and 1 credit unquiry for a utility recently. My score is is between 780 and 810 (depending upon the credit agency). I would suggest a few things, first get your debt ratio down to about 15% (under 20%) that makes a big difference. Second try not to use all your credit cards, limit the use to one credit card or maybe 2. (this also helps your auto insurance score). Third never let your debit limit per month cross 20% to get top notch scores. I pay off my card mid month if I’ve made some large purchases. With this you should see a good increase in your score in a few months.
    Cut all mine in half 20 years ago, paid them all off. Never went back. Married, 2 kids, 4 cars and a decent mortgage rate. Live on cash and savings and lay away plans. In 20 years I have learned one thing, credit cards are GARBAGE. Live within your means even if its poor and making balogna sandwiches for lunch and telling people at the office “Nope, packed my lunch.” and driving a beat up car. Trust me. Never went back, have more left on my paycheck to save and put away and best thing I ever did. I still can buy a car and house juuust fine. The offers come in the mail, I rip then in 1/2 and throw them in the trash without a second thought.
    If your FICO score is not as high as you would like it to be, there are things you can do to improve it. First of all, be sure to keep all of your bills current and in good standing. Always pay your bills when they come due, never make any payments late, and pay more than the minimum balance on your credit cards or pay them off completely if you can. The longer you have a good payment history, the higher your credit score will be.
    For some outside perspectives on just how realistic reaching the top of the credit-score scale is and how fruitful of an accomplishment that would be, we posed the following questions to a panel of personal finance experts. Meet them and see what they had to say, below.
    A credit score measures how likely you are to repay money you’ve borrowed. This can only be demonstrated over time. How long does it take to hit the highest credit score? Since credit payment histories can go back seven years — and 10 in the case of bankruptcy — you may need a seven-year time period.3 Plus, any accounts in your name are included in your credit report for as long as they stay open and active, so these continuously contribute to your score.4
    my credit sucks….and part of it is my fault….part not….i have always been in low paying jobs…struggling…..had a nice house….then my now ex decided not to pay the mortgage and not tell me…..then i remarried to a man making 60,000 up a year driving a truck…..had another house, car payment, i stayed home with the kids (day care was more than i earned)…..oops….husband developed parkinson’s disease…..can no longer drive…..so of course, i went back to work…..but what i could earn…..would not pay the bills…..lost the house, returned the car to the bank…..found a cheaper house that my salary could pay….end of story…now owe less than 10,000 on the house we are buying from a private person…..never been late on a house payment in 7 years…..have not had any utilites turned off….do not use credit at all……so my credit score is under 600….because the house is not reported.
    When I was 16 I had a credit card in my name that was connected to my parents account. Because of this I had enough credit when I was on my own. Then when I shared apartments I made sure to have a utility in my name. You can get a credit card with maybe $1000 limit but do not charge more than 10% off that limit a month! That’s how I started out my credit and my first score was 750! Years later after building I’m at 812. You can’t get much higher than that.
    If you’re at 600 and struggling not to drop further, your situation is different. Maybe you’ve had a series of late payments or have debts in collections. These are signs that your financial situation is unstable.
    Some of these have different credit score ranges, so while VantageScore 3.0 and FICO scores run from 300 – 850, there are others that may run from 501-990 or 360–840, for example. You can generally find out what score’s in use by looking at the sheet or site on which the score is being supplied.
    Lenders typically use your 3-digit credit score to help them decide if they’ll approve you for a loan or credit card. In general, the higher your score, the better your chances of getting approved. Having a good credit score can also help you save on interest rates.

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