Do You Make These Simple Mistakes In credit repair? | Asbury Park NJ

my credit sucks….and part of it is my fault….part not….i have always been in low paying jobs…struggling…..had a nice house….then my now ex decided not to pay the mortgage and not tell me…..then i remarried to a man making 60,000 up a year driving a truck…..had another house, car payment, i stayed home with the kids (day care was more than i earned)…..oops….husband developed parkinson’s disease…..can no longer drive…..so of course, i went back to work…..but what i could earn…..would not pay the bills…..lost the house, returned the car to the bank…..found a cheaper house that my salary could pay….end of story…now owe less than 10,000 on the house we are buying from a private person…..never been late on a house payment in 7 years…..have not had any utilites turned off….do not use credit at all……so my credit score is under 600….because the house is not reported.
My credit was excellent and then I decided to get a new car, motorcycle & some of those cc’s with good points, rewards. That dropped my score down to bac down fair at the moment! I have quite a few cc’s and all are paid in full each month. So I know my score will go back up. Actually, I”m trying to raise it as high to 850 as I can. It seems after following these forums, you can see what you need to do to have an excellent score. I had a mortgage a couple cc’s. Not enough to get that “excellent” score. I’m starting to see they want you to be able to “handle” your credit very wisely. A higher cl but a very low utilization seems to do the trick with a various mix of loans. Thanks everyone for your input. I would be stuck in the 600’s forever if I didn’t start reading this forum!
Very similar beginnings you and I. The medical bills ALWAYS GET PAID LAST. Bro, if your at 639 I am sure you have learned enough to stop paying that $100 a month. Here is a trick to boost the score without adding debt and costing WAY less. Join a credit union. Do you own a car? it doesn’t matter… Join the CU and take out 12 month loans of $1500. Once you get the loan put it in the checking account and FORGET IT IS EVEN THERE. Set the payment so it is auto drafted from your account and just make sure you remember to deposit the interest. repeat the following year. If you can get a no fee credit card or maybe a $25 a year CC that you WILL BE ABLE TO PAY IN FULL EVERY MONTH. Use the CC like you would your check book. Balance and DO NOT buy what you do NOT need. Pay in full every month. WAIT! Want a free lunch? lol On that card it is a MUST to leave a small balance. The bank has to get something from you… Take the wife and kid to a fancy restaurant like WENDY’S…lol…. Try to carry a 60-70 dollar balance. Good Luck! my oldest just turned 18. I always worried about raising them, not letting them go.. Peace OUT!
How in (or why in) God’s name would you want to be retired at 56 with only 22k in annual income. Unless you’ve got some other stash of cash you’re drawing from you’re going to be clipping coupons and eating mac and cheese for dinner every day.
The three major credit bureaus rely on five types of information to calculate your credit score. They collect this information from a variety of sources, and compile it to give you an overall score. The score is comprised of 35% payment history, 30% amount owed, 15% credit history, 10% new credit, and 10% credit diversity.
The accumulation of wealth and experience over time is the most likely explanation for this. As people age, they also tend to grow more financially responsible and secure, qualities that lend themselves to credit improvement. And the more time you have, the more opportunity there is to recover from mistakes. Another reason is the way credit scores are calculated. The length of your credit history accounts for a significant portion of your score (around 15%), for one thing.
Criteria used: Credit needed, tools to track credit score, ability to improve credit line, rewards rate, rewards categories, sign-up bonuses, redemption options, promotional 0% APR periods, annual fee, other rates and fees, extra features and benefits, customer service, ease of application
You say that,”our assumption is the arrogant one.” It’s clear that your assumption is, but you’ve used the first person plural, which indicates that you are not alone in your arrogance. Who is with you?
Experis has a client seeking an interim controller role while seeking the perm candidate Duration 1-3 months, understanding it could extend until the position is filled Location Ft. Mills/Rock Hill South Carolina Systems JDE Primary responsibilities o Cash…

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There are, however, some key differences. One is that, unlike in the United States, where a consumer is allowed only one free copy of their credit report a year, in Canada, the consumer may order a free copy of their credit report any number of times in a year, as long as the request is made in writing, and as long as the consumer asks for a printed copy to be delivered by mail.[8][9] This request by the consumer is noted in the credit report as a ‘soft inquiry’, so it has no effect on their credit score. According to Equifax’s ScorePower Report, Equifax Beacon scores range from 300 to 900. Trans Union Emperica scores also range from 300 and 900.
I assume your asking if getting more credit cards lower your scores–is that correct? The answer is “it depends,” A new account will affect your scores but usually it levels out after a few months. But that doesn’t mean you want to load up on a wallet full of cards in a short period of time.
Because the FICO credit score can only be determined by information found in the individual’s credit file, it is essential to look over your credit reports each year to find any inaccuracies or discrepancies to ensure that everything is accurate and up to date. Click here to learn more about how you can obtain your free credit reports. As a consumer, you are entitled to one free credit file disclosure from the three bureaus every twelve months.
No matter where your credit score lays in comparison to everyone else’s, just remember that “personal finance” is called that for a reason: each individual has personal reasons for spending and saving money as they do.
On my 18th Birthday I went to Discover.com because I had seen promotions for it on TV and also noticed my parents used it on a daily basis. My mom loved her Discover card and they have had it for over 10 years. I was approved for the Discover IT Card with a $500 limit. Over the course of the next year they inceased my limit to $1,500. I was happy I was using it and reaping rewards left and right. I got greedy so I applied for the BestBuy Credit Card because I had worked there for sometime. Fast forward this along about 2 years later I had $3,000 in debt. I applied for 3 cards all on the same day and my limits were raised to $25,000 between all of my cards. I felt like the king. I had a Chase Sapphire Preferred card. It was metal! I was as cool as could be. Well I am now 21 I HAD a score of 780 and yeah its fallen to about 620. To this day I am working on paying my debts down by 0% Balance Transfer Cards but still paying my life away to banks and debt. Be smart about Credit and dont jack it up along the way. Credit runs this world we live in and without a near perfect score you will lose.
It is almost impossible to get a good credit score with TransUnion. I pay everything ahead of time and never late. My husband and I have a 6 figure job. We are never late, with any bill. It is being made harder and harder to keep your score higher with the changing in FICO, ADVANTAGE, or PLUS SCORE. Who knows which way a lender is going to choose. A person with a good job, who pays their bills on time everytime can still get screwed! Saddest part, we are far from being over extended! But you do have to keep an eye on your credit reports, because open and in good standing accounts can go to closed and derogatory. I am still cleaning up 3 student loans on all 3 credit bureaus that happened to me. I tried to fix it, had to hire someone to do it for me. Happened in January, dropped my score over 70 points. So you have to keep an eye on the credit bureaus. It’s all a game, they keep your scores low so businesses sell at higher interest rates and they get kick backs. Name of the game. You just have to be better at it than them!
If you want to buy a car, you won’t get the best rates, but dealerships are accustomed to credit-challenged customers, says NerdWallet auto writer Phil Reed. Chances are you can get some wheels if you have enough income to make payments. “Auto loans are different, with a bit more flexibility than other loans, mainly because the car is the collateral,” Reed said. His advice: Be patient and compare offers. Loans targeted at those with subprime credit can be unreasonably costly.
An easier quicker way to raise your score after bankruptcy is to make WEEKLY payoffs on your credit card. I raised my score 30+ points within 3 months by doing that after my bankruptcy. I don’t personally like to pay someone interest…and rarely have in my life….just on cars and homes. I too took out a loan but only paid minimum payments for 3 months…then paid the whole thing off with savings. I didn’t want to pay them tons of months of interest. Only wanted to pay 3 months to raise my score. If you want to get a secured loan, I wouldn’t go as high as $1000. Just do $200 or $250…that way you can raise your score with payments, but not lose much in interest money.
Here are some financial tips to get there: 1) Merely paying your bills on time is no longer enough. Don’t get me wrong about this fundamental habit; the consequence of not paying what you owe on time is the ding on your credit history every time. Since we’re talking about shooting for the highest score, you’ve got to do more than pay on time. Instead of paying one time per month, why not do two payments per month or on a bi-weekly basis? Show the credit card companies how prudent you are. 2) Spend no more than 10% of the credit limit, consistently. If your credit limit is $1,000, then the magic number for you not to cross is $100. Think creatively in advance what you can do with a $100 budget. Could it be your gas bill, eating out, books, etc?  Use your imaginations, and best of luck!
The average American doesn’t even reach the “Good” level for their credit score. If you find that you are falling under the average, you don’t need to worry. In about 12 month’s time, you should be able to significantly improve your credit score if you are responsible with your credit. If you are planning to take out a car loan, then you could raise your score during those 12 months, save up for a larger down payment, and in the end get the car you want, pay less in interest, and have it paid off sooner.
You forgot one simple thing in your practice. each new credit account splits your credit age average. So taking on that many accounts at once is what hurts your score. But good news is more account less of a split and the faster year lenght of credit goes up. Most people don’t realize there is several factors to a heathy credit report. Also having to many types of the same line of credits will hurt you in the lenders eyes. Good example 1 visa,1 master card, 2 store cards, 1 personal loan. 1 morgage. If all your credits are loans it shows you got less borrowing potential, if all is revolving credit it shows you can max every thing out to fast. just few things to consider for a healthy porfolio
Thanks for the link! that explains that. I should of just went for the full HELOC that I qualified for, and only borrowed what I needed. BTW The loan went into a garage and new roofing which gave me additional equity as well!
If you are looking for simple ways to effectively improve a bad credit score, you should focus on paying your bills on time as agreed upon, maintain positive payment history with your lenders, pay down all your debt to help improve the credit utilization ratio, and only apply for a credit account when you really need it. Try to keep the hard inquiries on your credit files to a minimum. Too many can have a negative impact on your credit scores.
When you receive a credit score, you should also receive scale information like the one above. Looking at the context of where your score stands is more important than the actual number itself. You will also probably receive some information about why your score is what it is. That’s the information you want to focus on because it will provide a roadmap for boosting your score, says Susan Henson, a consumer credit expert at Experian.
You guys are truly all helpful. Would just like to say, thank you. Its too bad that there are so many complicated credit scoring models and too bad that this affects everyone in this country. I used to be one of those people that were afraid to check their credit , but have improved it over the past year. I will recommend applying for a Discover card to get a Free FICO score included in your monthly statement. I would also recommend using credit.com and CK.com to help track your progress , NOT just to simply check your scores. The scores they give you are “guesstimates” but can be close to accurate. I also applied for a secured card and within 6 months, the card became unsecured and credit limit went up from $600 to $1500. I’m assuming it could go up another $1500 if I keep making payments on time, but I would recommend this to anyone with bad credit. My FICO score went from 545 to 684 from 8/2014 to 8/2015. Feels amazing and I know at this point , that you MUST start somewhere! I even paid $80 a month for CreditSaint and/or LexingtonLaw to remove the bigger issues on my credit report. They are both great. If you can afford another $80 a month, help them, help you and cancel when you have a better idea on what to do. You must be responsible and straight forward if you want to move along in life with improving your credit. Use all the free tools to learn and take it from there! Good luck to all and thank you again to all on credit.com and all other blogs contributing to this credit world!
Scores by VantageScore are also types of credit scores that are commonly used by lenders. The VantageScore was developed by the 3 major credit bureaus including Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. The latest VantageScore 3.0 model uses a range between 300 and 850. A VantageScore above 700 is generally considered to be good, while above 750 is considered to be excellent.
I have a score between 690 and 720 depending on the reporting agency. Seems to be no problem getting a CC but was turned down by 5 out of 6 banks for a car loan. Their reason was a prior bankruptcy and not enough credit. Seems that the credit score ultimately has little importance. I am retired with pretty good income and paid for home and cash in the bank. What’s the point of a good credit score if I get turned down anyway?
Even though it’s within the “fair” category, you can still do quite a bit in terms of loans. An FHA home loan, for example, only requires a score of 580 to qualify and take advantage of the program’s 3.5% down payment.
Lenders may choose to use non-FICO credit scores to gain additional insight on consumers, especially those with limited traditional credit history who might be difficult to score. These scores may be added to the FICO score if they provide unique insights or used instead of the FICO score if they provide similar predictiveness. Most of these scores are based significantly on data not available through the national credit bureaus, such as rental, utility, and telecom payment data or public record information such as property deeds and mortgages, liens, personal property titles, tax records, and licensing data.

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