9 Things Spock Would Say About credit repair | Keansburg New Jersey 07734 NJ

Why are credit scores so different between each credit reporting agency? Mine are about 70 points different. I have a year of on time payments, but score is still in the 600 area, no credit previously.
A good credit score can also get you a lower interest rate when you borrow. That means you will pay less over time. For example, if you’re buying a $300,000 house with a 30-year fixed mortgage, and you have good credit, then you could end up paying more than $90,000 less for that house over the life of the loan than if you had bad credit. So, in the end, it really pays to understand your credit scores and to make them as strong as possible.
I’m seeing a lot of young people with this type of credit. A high score doesn’t always equate to good credit, or even if you have a high score, lenders will not always pick up for a loan. Young people tend to have hyper inflated scores because in reality, they have no credit. 1 year of paying off your card is not good enough. Lenders don’t really start taking you serious until you have had quite a few years under your belt. It took me about 3 years to get a good visa card from my credit union with a limit of $7500, and only then they did it after I had several installment loans that I paid off, and an auto loan. In the same way, not using your credit but having several open accounts is also bad. Lenders will the potential debt you could get into, and if you have 10 cards with $1000 limits each,  you have the potential debt of $10,000 and they actually take that into consideration when they look at your debt to income ratio. The best way is to open maybe 2 cards (major cards not store as they have high interest rates) and use them only occassionally being sure to pay them off in 1 month.
Georgia, along with several other southern states, ranks lowest in the nation for credit with an average score of just 636. In fact, based on the ranges above, that is considered poor credit. States with lower credit scores also tend to have higher debt balances and delinquency rates. That makes sense because both of those factors contribute to lower credit scores.
@MollyMcGuier What you mean by “Set the payment so it is auto drafted from your account and just make sure you remember to deposit the interest.” Are you suggesting to use the same money from the loan to pay it off? What interest is being deposited, and it is going back into that same checking account or into savings?
FICO scores (the best known and the ones lenders generally use) run from 300 to 850. Anything above 720 is an A. About half the population has A-minus or better credit. Historically, about 10 percent of the population has an 800 or better. Nearly 25 percent of consumers have a rating of C or below.
Many people out there have struggled through this “depression” and their credit scores have gone down. Yet they have managed to survive and pay their bills. They have paid late, because of loss of jobs etc. Its been reported that 75% of the country have a 620 score or below. An now they are being tagged as poor credit. They are the ones who struggled to stay out of foreclosure, or bankruptcy. You are the middle class who are the victims. Start calling your congressman and woman to change the Dodd Frank banking laws.
But if you have fair credit, all hope is not lost. While lenders typically prefer credit scores to fall in the good to excellent range, people with fair credit scores are still considered viable applicants for many loans. Additionally, with some work, persistence and responsible credit usage, you can improve your credit score.
What do you need credit for? You have a car and a house. Pay for everything with cash, start saving for the new car you know you will need in the future, and when it comes time for you to get a new car, pay for it in full. Besides the ease and safety of paying for things with a credit card, you have no need for credit anymore so you have no need for any kind of credit score… Am I right?
Tom Pavelka, an assistant district director at the Department of Labor’s Office of Workers’ Compensation in Cleveland, has no doubt that some of his ability to manage his finances easily stems from the fact that the couple have no children — just Freddie, a cat from a shelter. They can charge a couple of thousand dollars on a credit card and easily pay it off the next month.
Ultimately, what’s considered a good or fair credit score will depend on how the lender views it, but you can get an idea of how lenders are likely to view your applications by checking your score and seeing how it compares to others.
While the FICO score calculation doesn’t directly consider age, 15% of the score comes from the length of your credit history—putting younger people at a natural disadvantage. Likewise, 10% of the score is based on the mix of debt you have; it’s better to have a diverse mix—from a mortgage to student debt to car loans—than a single credit card. (And younger consumers are less likely to have a mortgage; the median age of first-time home buyers is 32, a report last year found.)
Common ways that consumers improve their credit ratings are by contacting the major credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) and asking them to remove reporting errors, paying down credit card balances and paying off accounts that have been placed in collections. Another tactic is to ask for an increased credit limit on your credit cards. For people who carry credit card balances, an increased credit limit lowers the credit-to-debt ratio, a key factor in credit scoring.
Pre-collect Letter Service: Many NACM Affiliates will send two or three effective, money-producing letters, usually 10 days apart, to a past-due customer. Each letter is progressively stronger and stresses the importance of paying before the account is assigned for collection. If the debtor fails to respond during the pre-collect period, the account automatically receives immediate action service.
Financial Professional Associate Build and Grow a Professional Sales Career With an average of 10,000 baby boomers reaching retirement age each day1 there has never been a better time to enter the financial services industry. Do you have what it tak…
I had a car dealer apply for a loan thru 2 different banks. I got approved with both but went with the lower interest one. after about 3 months with my new car, I started receiving letters from the bank I didn’t have a loan with telling me I was late on my payments. I called them and told them I didn’t have a loan with them which they said yes you do. I ended up having to get a lawyer and I still could not get it removed from my Credit report. I disputed it and everything. Unreal. Come to find out the lawyer I hired played golf with the car dealer.. They were both worthless..
0% or 2.99%-for-12-months cc to pay off the other cards, but ALL say she’s got too much cc debt. I don’t get it! I tell her to explain the new balance transfer cc will eliminate other debt, but no company will listen. WHAT am I missing?
I have a 731 credit score and I just turned 21, never got any loans besides a student loan which I started paying automatically in November of last year, my credit history is just over a year old, had several late payments and maxed out one of my 2 credit cards yet my score had went up from 674 in January to 731 in April…and my credit lines doubled…all I did was make most of my purchases with my credit cards and pay the entire thing every couple weeks.
I have been working on repairing my credit for years. Finally I get a good score working on excellent. Then, I get a letter from an old credit card debit that I started 14 years and thought that I had satisfied the debit until I get a letter claiming I still owe $2,000 offering a selllement of $1,000. I asked who the were and to prove that I still owe them. Nobody has contacted me in 7 years about this debit. They gave me 30 days to resolve it. What can they really do with an 7 years of old debit that nobody has contacted me for so long?
In general, a FICO credit score above 650 is considered good, although many people strive to be above 750. It is practically impossible to score a perfect 850 FICO score because there are a lot of different items from your credit report which go into calculating your FICO score. Keep in mind that different lenders (mortgage, credit card, automobile loan) will use different methods of credit scoring to assess your credit risk.
Most people carry some sort of debt these days, whether it be a mortgage, outstanding credit card balances, or some type of personal loan. But paying down your debt, particularly on high interest balances outside of your mortgage, can go a long way in helping out your credit score.
Do you have some kind of credit monitoring service with Experian? If you don’t then I would be concerned that this is some kind of phishing attempt to get your personal information. If you do have their service, then it sounds like you have reached a credit score goal…
The marginal benefit of moving from a good credit score to an excellent one is important for getting the best interest rates on the largest and highest-quality loans. My advice is to make the personal finance choices that earn you an excellent score. Beyond that, what drives the decision? Ego? Vanity? Bragging rights? Who’s to say what is rational, if you believe the benefit outweighs the cost.
Think of your credit scores like a report card that you might review at the end of a school term, but instead of letter grades, your activity ends up within a scoring range. However, unlike academic grades, credit scores aren’t stored as part of your credit history. Rather, your score is generated each time a lender requests it, according to the credit scoring model of their choice.
A credit score is a numerical expression based on a level analysis of a person’s credit files, to represent the creditworthiness of an individual. A credit score is primarily based on a credit report information typically sourced from credit bureaus.
First credit scores and the bureau’s are the biggest jokes out there. How come they only look at loans and credit cards. Why not look at everyone’s normal bills like rent or mortgage, gas bills, electric bills and you get the drift. It’s a scam out there. Then if you have bad credit you can find someone with good credit and have them put you on there credit cards without even using it. The credit world is bad and that’s why the big banks are hurting.
If you score is high enough on the GMAT to get into your top-choice graduate school, do you need to take the exam again in an attempt to raise your score further? Likewise, if your credit score is already excellent, what is the benefit of making it perfect and what would be the cost of doing so?
Yes, you can, but not by using the standard credit scoring models. The most popular credit scores, including VantageScore 3.0 and 4.0 and FICO 8 and 9, all use the standard range of 300 to 850, so a credit score of 900 isn’t possible with those models. But some older models, as well as some alternative scores, do go up to 900 (or even beyond). You can learn more about credit scores with unusually high ranges here: https://wallethub.com/edu/900-credit-score/39567/. That being said, a credit score of 900 is not very relevant. You probably won’t encounter these ratings often, so you should rather pay attention to where you stand on the standard credit score range. You can figure that out easily by checking your latest credit score for free on WalletHub. Hope this helps!
Lenders need not reveal their credit score head, nor need they reveal the minimum credit score required for the applicant to be accepted. Owing only to this lack of information to the consumer, it is impossible for him or her to know in advance if they will pass a lender’s credit scoring requirements. However, it may still be useful for consumers to gauge their chances of being successful with their credit or loan applications by checking their credit score prior to applying.
Credit Management Company is committed to providing our business partners with optimum accounts receivable management, debt recovery, and customer care programs through years of expertise, advanced technology, and clear communication.
The accumulation of wealth and experience over time is the most likely explanation for this. As people age, they also tend to grow more financially responsible and secure, qualities that lend themselves to credit improvement. And the more time you have, the more opportunity there is to recover from mistakes. Another reason is the way credit scores are calculated. The length of your credit history accounts for a significant portion of your score (around 15%), for one thing.
Have you obtained your free credit score from Credit.com? If so what are each of the five grades? Also if you haven’t reviewed your credit reports yet, you may want to do that and dispute anything that is inaccurate or incomplete. Any accounts that aren’t confirmed by the source must be deleted.
Credit History and Mix: Credit scores consider the type of debt you have (such as credit cards and loans) along with how long you’ve had it. Using a variety of credit accounts over a long period of time can improve your credit score.

average credit score

credit management

highest credit score

It takes a lot to maintain a high credit score, including low amounts of debt and on-time payments, just to name a few things. But one influencing factor might surprise you: where you live. A recent study by GOBankingRates used data from Experian to find the states with the best and the worst credit scores.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *